Mike Beebe, Todd Day & Ron Brewer at the inaugural Mike Conley, Jr. All-Star Classic

 

Here are some scenes from Thursday night’s Real Deal in the Rock event featuring all-star teams from Arkansas and Tennessee. Tennessee won 81-78. Stay tuned for an upcoming piece in Sporting Life Arkansas for details and video on Razorback signees Nick Babb and Trey Thompson.

Rep. Reginald Murdock (Marianna) points while Gov. Mike Beebe and Real Deal co-founder Bill Ingram look on
Rep. Reginald Murdock (Marianna) points while Gov. Mike Beebe and Real Deal co-founder Bill Ingram look on
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Former Razorback All-American Todd Day (L) shakes hands with Arkansas signee Nick Babb. Day, a Memphis native, was coach of the Tennessee All-Star team.
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Coach Ron Brewer gives some pointers to all-state Daryl Macon of Parkview.
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Razorback signee Anton Beard sure would have helped the Arkansas All-Star team on Thursday night, but said he couldn’t play because he’d already committed to two other All-Star games.
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Former Razorback All-American Ron Brewer coached the Arkansas All-Star team. Here, he’s giving love to Davell Roby, a Tennessee player who will play for Saint Louis University.

Before Derek Fisher, Dexter Reed Put Parkview High Basketball On the Map

A year before Eddie Sutton's arrival, Dexter Reed passed on a chance to join the Triplets in Fayetteville.
A year before Eddie Sutton’s arrival, Dexter Reed passed on a chance to join the Triplets in Fayetteville.

It’s March, which means basketball fever is spreading through Arkansas. Interest in the high school state tournament is extra high this year as the state enjoys a high school basketball golden age thanks to headliners like junior KeVaughn Allen and sophomore Malik Monk. Both highly recruited shooting guards are accomplished beyond their years. Last year, Allen helped lead North Little Rock to a state title as a sophomore and picked up Finals MVP along the way. Monk, ranked by some outlets as the best shooting guard in the nation in his class, may one-up him. Despite two late season losses, Monk has helped turn Bentonville into a powerhouse for the first time in a long time while racking up obscene box scores. (Who else hits 11 of 12 three-pointers, as Monk did in one January game?)

Allen and Monk, who both stand around 6-3, aren’t the first sophomore wing players to dominate the local high school scene. In the early 1970s, another great high school golden age was tipping off and Little Rock native Dexter Reed was in the thick of it. The 6-2 guard went on one of the most devastating tourney tears of any era to lead Little Rock Parkview to its first state title.

In 1971, Parkview had only existed for three years. All the dynastic names affiliated with the school now — Ripley, Flanigan, Fisher — were still far off in the future. These ‘71 Patriots finished their regular season with a 15-12 record, but caught fire in the state tournament at Barton Coliseum, knocking off Jacksonville, McClellan, Jonesboro and finally, Helena. Through those four games, Reed averaged 27 points including 43 to secure the Class AAA title, then the state’s second largest. Ron Brewer, who regularly played pickup ball with Reed in the 1970s, said his friend was among the best scorers in state history: “He was like a choreographer out there, just dancing and weaving and getting the defense all discombobulated. And when it’s all said and done, he just destroyed you. He destroyed you by himself.”

Reed was a different kind of player from Monk and Allen but effective in his own way. The new schoolers are both extremely explosive athletes with deep three-point range. Reed didn’t play above the rim, and he didn’t see much reason to shoot 21-footers in his three point shot-less era. “I wasn’t the best of shooters,” he says. “I was more of a scorer. I could get by people, you know — I tried to be like Earl the Pearl.”

Reed won another title as a junior and by his senior year was a second-team Parade All-American who had hundreds of scholarship offers. The University of Arkansas was an early favorite. Reed had grown up a Razorback fan, and many in his inner circle wanted to see him play for coach Lanny Van Eman. Among those was local coach Houston Nutt, Sr., who had taught him the game’s fundamentals. “He had a lot of influence on me,” says Reed, who as a boy had sold popcorn at War Memorial Stadium with Houston Nutt, Jr.

Memphis State University, fresh off a national championship appearance, also entered the recruiting picture. Reed’s parents liked the fact that its campus was more than an hour closer to their home than Fayetteville. Other factors tipped the scales Memphis’ way. For starters, the Tigers played in an arena that didn’t make Reed uncomfortable. One area of the Hogs’ Barnhill Fieldhouse where the football team worked out was covered in sawdust. “I had sinus problems, and I’d be coughing there during summer basketball camps,” he says. Moreover, Reed’s older brother already attended the UA but had had trouble socially acclimating. Reed’s brother told him to strongly consider a larger city as Fayetteville was then a small town and there “wasn’t but a handful of black kids.”

Dexter Reed chose Memphis State and as a freshman immediately made a splash, racking up more than 500 points and leading the Tigers to a 19-11 finish. A serious injury to his knee ligaments the following season diminished his quickness, but he bounced back to average 18.8 points a game as a senior and landed on two All-America teams.

One highlight his last year was a return to Little Rock to play a surging Hogs program under new coach Eddie Sutton. As Sutton’s first great Hogs team, that 1976–77 bunch only lost one regular season game. On Dec. 30, 1976, a then record crowd jammed into Barton Coliseum to watch Reed, the greatest scorer Little Rock had ever produced, square off against Hog stars like Brewer, a junior, and sophomores Sidney Moncrief and Marvin Delph. They were all friends and ribbed each other in advance of Reed’s only college game in his hometown. Brewer recalls, “Me, Sidney and Marvin kept saying ‘You can come back all you want, but you ain’t gonna win this one.’ And he single handily kept them in the ballgame.”

Arkansas led for most of it, with Reed guarding Moncrief and then Brewer. But Reed and the bigger Tigers finished strong, with Reed hitting free throws down the stretch to clinch a 69-62 win. “I didn’t really think it was that big to my teammates, but after it was over, they all came over jumping on me,” Reed says. As he left the arena, he recalled seeing some of the same people in the crowd who had watched him burst onto the stage seven years earlier as a Parkview sophomore. “It was like a time warp,” he says.

Fast forward to the present, and Reed still lives in Memphis, where he runs sign and flower shops and hosts a sports radio show every Saturday morning. His parents have passed, so he doesn’t make it back to Little Rock much anymore. But he still follows the Razorbacks, and he’s heard from friends and Memphis coaches about some of the state’s great high school guards like KeVaughn Allen. Reed is glad to know the tradition he helped nourish is in good hands. He concludes, “My heart has always been with Arkansas.”

An earlier version of this story was originally published in this month’s issue of Celebrate Arkansas.

NBA Arkansans Ranked In Order of Highest Scoring Game

joe johnson 29-points-quarter
You go, Joe.

On Monday night, Joe Johnson had a quarter for the ages. In one twelve-minute span, the Brooklyn Net scored 29 points including eight three-pointers. That’s historic stuff – tying an NBA record for most threes in a quarter and four points away from the record for most points in a quarter.

But Johnson’s spectacular play in the third quarter didn’t extend to the rest of the game. In the first half, he scored eight points and declined an opportunity to play in the fourth. He ended up totaling 37 points – only the 11th highest scoring game of his career.

Johnson’s third-quarter explosion was noteworthy because he’s never been a supremely explosive scorer. Although he was a main scoring option in Atlanta for years, his career high is 42 points. Where does this career high rank all-time among NBA Arkansans?

Wonder no more. Below are all instances of an NBA Arkansan scoring 40 or more points, ranked in order of highest scoring games.

Carroll, a Pine Bluff native, holds the top spot.
Carroll, a Pine Bluff native, holds the top spot.

1. Joe Barry Carroll

Rk       Age       Date  Tm  Opp   GS MP FG FGA  FG% 2P 2PA  2P% 3P 3PA 3P% FT FTA   FT% PTS 
1     24-224 1983-03-05 GSW  UTA W       22  32 .688 22           0          8  13  .615 52     
2     22-211 1981-02-20 GSW  SDC L       17          17           0         12  17  .706 46     
3     28-192 1987-02-01 GSW  NJN W  1 55 15  37 .405 15  37 .405  0   0     13  18  .722 43 
4     24-196 1983-02-05 GSW  SAS W       14  26 .538 14           0         12  14  .857 40
Age = XX-YYY; XX=Years Old, YYY=Days Old

2. Scottie Pippen

Rk       Age       Date  Tm  Opp   GS MP FG FGA  FG% 2P 2PA   2P% 3P 3PA   3P% FT FTA   FT% PTS 
1     31-146 1997-02-18 CHI  DEN W  1 41 19  27 .704 17  22  .773  2   5  .400  7   7 1.000 47 
2     25-151 1991-02-23 CHI  CHH W  1 31 16  17 .941 16  17  .941  0   0       11  15  .733 43 
3     26-156 1992-02-28 CHI  MIL W  1 42 17  24 .708 17  23  .739  0   1  .000  7   7 1.000 41 
4     30-146 1996-02-18 CHI  IND W  1 44 14  26 .538 10  19  .526  4   7  .571  8  10  .800 40 
5     29-167 1995-03-11 CHI  LAL L  1 40 16  26 .615 12  19  .632  4   7  .571  4   5  .800 40
One of the few stats where he outdid the Sid in the pros.
One of the few stats where he outdid the Sid in the pros.

3. Ron Brewer

Rk       Age       Date  Tm  Opp   GS MP FG FGA  FG% 2P 2PA  2P% 3P 3PA 3P% FT FTA   FT% PTS 
1     26-055 1981-11-10 SAS  LAL W       19          19           0          6   7  .857  44     
2     26-052 1981-11-07 SAS  NYK W       16          16           0          8   8 1.000  40

4. Sidney Moncrief

Rk       Age       Date  Tm  Opp   GS MP FG FGA  FG% 2P 2PA  2P% 3P 3PA   3P% FT FTA   FT% PTS 
1     26-059 1983-11-19 MIL  DEN L       13  17 .765 13           0           17  19  .895 43     
2     25-156 1983-02-24 MIL  HOU W       14  24 .583 14           0           14  14 1.000 42

5. Joe Johnson

Rk       Age       Date  Tm  Opp   GS MP FG FGA  FG% 2P 2PA  2P% 3P 3PA   3P% FT FTA   FT% PTS 
1     24-251 2006-03-07 ATL  GSW W  1 48 14  27 .519 10  17 .588  4  10  .400 10  10 1.000 42 
2     27-181 2008-12-27 ATL  CHI W  1 44 16  31 .516 12  25 .480  4   6  .667  5   6  .833 41 
3     28-173 2009-12-19 ATL  CHI L  1 48 16  32 .500 11  25 .440  5   7  .714  3   4  .750 40 
4     24-263 2006-03-19 ATL  ORL W  1 48 17  24 .708 12  19 .632  5   5 1.000  1   2  .500 40 
5     24-240 2006-02-24 ATL  IND W  1 47 16  24 .667 11  19 .579  5   5 1.000  3   3 1.000 40 
6     24-213 2006-01-28 ATL  CHI L  1 46 16  25 .640 12  21 .571  4   4 1.000  4   4 1.000 40

6. Alvin Robertson

Rk       Age       Date  Tm  Opp   GS MP FG FGA  FG% 2P 2PA  2P% 3P 3PA   3P% FT FTA   FT% PTS 
1     23-152 1985-12-21 SAS  DEN W  1 43 14  19 .737 13  18 .722  1   1 1.000 12  14  .857 41 
2     25-272 1988-04-19 SAS  LAL L  1 44 17  28 .607 16  25 .640  1   3  .333  5   6  .833 40 

7. Todd Day
Rk       Age       Date  Tm  Opp   GS MP FG FGA  FG% 2P 2PA  2P% 3P 3PA   3P% FT FTA   FT% PTS 
1     25-349 1995-12-22 BOS  MIN W  0 38 11  18 .611  6  10 .600  5   8  .625 14  16  .875 41 

8. Corliss Williamson
Rk       Age       Date  Tm  Opp   GS MP FG FGA  FG% 2P 2PA  2P% 3P 3PA   3P% FT FTA   FT% PTS 
1     24-090 1998-03-04 SAC  DET W  1 40 16  23 .696 16  23 .696  0   0        8   9  .889 40 

9. Archie Clark
Rk       Age       Date  Tm  Opp   GS MP FG FGA FG% 2P 2PA 2P% 3P 3PA 3P% FT FTA   FT% PTS 
1     30-134 1971-11-26 BAL  ATL W       15                               10  11  .909 40

O.K. Hard as I might try, I just can't slam the door on folks who nearly scored 40 points
but fell a shade short. Here are members of the 39-Point Club:
Eddie Miles
Rk       Age       Date  Tm  Opp   GS MP FG FGA  FG% 2P 2PA 2P% 3P 3PA 3P% FT FTA   FT% PTS 
1     27-251 1968-03-12 DET  SEA W       18                                 3   3 1.000 39

Darrell Walker
Rk       Age       Date  Tm  Opp   GS MP FG FGA  FG% 2P 2PA  2P% 3P 3PA   3P% FT FTA   FT% PTS 
1     26-014 1987-03-23 DEN  UTA L  1 36 13  18 .722 13  18 .722  0   0       13  16  .813 39 
2     26-002 1987-03-11 DEN  UTA W  1 40 14  21 .667 14  21 .667  0   0       11  14  .786 39

All-time Quarterfinals: Vote who wins Second Round Between the Best teams in State History

First blood is spilled, folks.

Your votes are in, and initial casualties of the Arkansas prep basketball tournament to end all tournaments are down. Here are the advancing teams:

1.  66.7% of participants voted ’04 West Memphis (Sonny Weems) would beat ’00 L.R. Fair (Kim Adams)

2. 86.7% ’99 L.R. Central (Joe Johnson) over ’54 Jonesboro (Don Riggs)

3. 60% ’59 Scipio Jones (Eddie Miles) over ’09 Fayetteville (Fred Gulley)

4. 55.6% ’84 Hall (Allie Freeman) beat ’75 L.R. Central (Robert Griffin)

(n.b. the seniors of that ’84 Hall team were the last Arkansas team to have as much success as Hall’s 2011-12 seniors, who on Friday night helped Hall win its fourth title in five years)

It’s now on to the second round, where the big boys who had received a first-round bye get into the action:

(1) 1979-1980  West Memphis
Final Record: 30-0
Stars: Michael Cage (6-8), Keith Lee (6-9), Stanley Andrews (guard)
Coach: Bill Terwilliger
Ranked third in nation, completed another 30-0 record the next season despite losing Cage to graduation

(2) 1973-74 Fort Smith Northside
Final Record: 30-0
Stars: Ron Brewer (6-4), Jon Raybon (6-1), Jerry Taylor (6-3)
Coach: Gayle Kaundart
In AAAA state finals, beat Hall (featuring Sidney Moncrief) 57-45; In overall state finals, beat Conway (featuring Marvin Delph) 37-32

(3) 1991-92 Little Rock Parkview
Final Record: 35-1 (injury sidelined starter James Lindsey in only loss, to Los Angeles team)
Stars: Dion Cross(6-2), Maurice Robinson(6-7 post), Derek Fisher (6-0)
Coach: Charles Ripley
Finished ranked #4 in nation, all five starters signed with Division I teams

(4) 1975-76 Conway
Final Record: 36-0
Stars: Lawson Pilgrim (6-5 forward), Austin Sullivan (5-9 guard), Herman Hammons (6-3 forward)
Coach: Joe Graham
Beat opponents by average of 24.6 points a game, closest margin was four points

Below are the quarterfinal matchups. If you missed the first round, check the bona fides of  lower-seeded teams here. Cast your votes by early Monday morning:

[polldaddy poll=6025054]

Boothead's not digging the Northside-Central speculation below.

[polldaddy poll=6025062]

[polldaddy poll=6025066]

[polldaddy poll=6025072]

If ’74 Northside really played ’99 Central, below is my take on what would happen, one of the many hypothetical game summaries from this week’s SYNC weekly:

Early on, Fort Smith’s physicality gives Central problems. Mickey Meimerstorf outmuscles Central’s Jarrett Hart and gets six points as the Grizzlies build a 28-24 halftime lead. In the second half, though, Fitzpatrick has Central concede inside position for better spacing around the perimeter. Johnson and Hart combine for four-of-six three-pointers as Jerry Taylor and Brewer still look uncomfortable defending post players so far from the basket. That flurry, along with ballhawking press led by sparkplug Tavoris Uzoigwe, allows the Tigers to build a 2-point lead with 15 seconds left. Brewer blows by Johnson for  a layup and foul, but misses his free throw. Raybon is called for a borderline foul on Mark Green with three seconds left. Green hits both to ice it.

Central wins 55-53.

Go here to see how this tourney ends

Comparing Hog Freshmen to the Best First-year Classes in Program History

Have B.J. Young and his frosh teammates risen to meet standards set by the likes of Sidney Moncrief, Todd Day and Scotty Thurman? Courtesy: Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

Seldom does an Arkansas freshman class enter the season with as many expectations as this year’s quartet of B.J. Young, Hunter Mickelson, Rashad Madden and Devonta Abron. Rarely are they needed to play as urgently as this group, which – following a summer of transfers and winter of injuries – now makes up half of Arkansas’ eight scholarship players.

But there is precedent.

In previous eras, new Razorbacks have made substantial splashes, kicking off the most celebrated three-year runs in program history. In the mid-1970s, the “Triplets,” three Arkansas natives within two years of each other, got it rolling for Eddie Sutton. The next two waves came under Nolan Richardson, and formed the nuclei of three Final Four appearances in the 1990s.
As a whole, this year’s freshmen haven’t played as many minutes as their predecessors. Expect that to change soon, though. As senior Michael Sanchez recovers from a shoulder injury, Mickelson and Abron will play more. Already, the new guys are setting records – Mickelson has blocked more shots than any previous Arkansas freshman, and these Hogs have won 17 home games, the most in program history.

Still, the Razorbacks lost their first seven games outside of Arkansas. Each of the previous celebrated freshmen classes had won at least three road games by this point in the season. By their second years, they led teams among the nation’s best on the road. Sure, the anticipated return of a healthy Marshawn Powell next season helps. But if this year’s freshmen wait until then to start living up to their predecessors’ standards, it will be too late. Their legacy won’t be determined by how many hearts they can win in their own arena. It will be set by how many are broken in other arenas.

Player

First season

Points per game

FG%

FT%

Rebounds per game

Minutes per game

Games

M. Delph

1974-75

6.2

50%

81%

2.5

N/A

26

R. Brewer*

1975-76

11.9

58%

75%

3.8

N/A

28

S. Moncrief

1975-76

12.6

67%

73%

7.6

N/A

28

1975-76 record through 25 games: 17-8
1975-76 record outside of Arkansas thru 25 games: 3-7
1976-77 overall record: 26-2
1977-78 overall record: 32-4