The Best 3rd & 4th Down Quarterbacks in Major College Football


Name School 3rd Down Rating
1 Everett Golson FSU 182.89
2 Vernon Adams Jr. Oregon 181.87
3 Anu Solomon Arizona 167.74
4 Trevone Boykin TCU 166.28
5 Seth Russell Baylor 164.21
6 Cody Kessler USC 163.15
7 DeShone Kizer Notre Dame 159.17
8 Patrick Mahomes II Texas Tech 157.45
9 Deshaun Watson Clemson 154.62
10 Treon Harris Florida 153.69
11 Matt Johns Virginia 152.6
12 Brandon Allen Arkansas 143.65
13 Luke Falk Wash St 142.6
14 Baker Mayfield Oklahoma 141.97
15 Jake Browning Washington 139.09
16 Will Grier Florida 138.88
17 Dak Prescott Mississippi State 138.69
18 Jacoby Brissett NC State 138.02
19 Sefo Liufau Colorado 137.68
20 Mason Rudolph Okla St 135.73
21 Montell Cozart Kansas 135.4
22 Jared Goff California 134.71
23 Mike Bercovici Ariz St 131.43
24 Connor Cook Mich St 128.19
25 Tommy Armstrong Jr. Nebraska 127.52
26 Kyle Allen Texas A&M 127.28
27 Patrick Towles Kentucky 126.81
28 Sam Richardson Iowa State 125.68
29 Lamar Jackson Louisville 125.66
30 Travis Wilson Utah 124.6
31 Skyler Howard WVU 122.53
32 Perry Orth South Carolina 121.25
33 Chris Laviano Rutgers 120.4
34 Tanner Mangum BYU 119.29
35 Jake Rudock Michigan 117.95
36 Joshua Dobbs Tennessee 117.3
37 Maty Mauk Missouri 117.06
38 Josh Rosen UCLA 116.85
39 Brenden Motley Va Tech 116.6
40 Thomas Sirk Duke 115.67
41 Jerrod Heard Texas 115.33
42 Sean White Auburn 114.19
43 C.J. Beathard Iowa 111.03
44 Ryan Willis Kansas 109.87
45 Clayton Thorson N’western 109.03
46 Mitch Leidner Minnesota 108.09
47 Johnny McCrary Vanderbilt 107.43
48 Nate Peterman Pittsburgh 105.74
49 Brad Kaaya Miami (Fl) 105.52
50 Chad Kelly Ole Miss 103.14
51 Joe Hubener Kansas St 102.4
52 Wes Lunt Illinois 102.24
53 Kevin Hogan Stanford 101.79
54 Cardale Jones Ohio State 101.11
55 Joel Stave Wisconsin 100.87
56 Marquise Williams N Carolina 100.28
57 Greyson Lambert Georgia 100.22
58 Nate Sudfeld Indiana 94.29
59 David Blough Purdue 91.29
60 Seth Collins Oregon St 88.71
61 Christian Hackenberg Penn State 85.55
62 Jake Coker Alabama 85.33
63 Caleb Rowe Maryland 84.26
64 John Wolford Wk Forest 83.82
65 Perry Hills Maryland 80.98
66 Jeremy Johnson Auburn 70.78
67 Kendall Hinton Wk Forest 67.88
68 Drew Lock Missouri 55.34
69 Justin Thomas Ga Tech 52.24
70 Kyle Bolin Louisville 48.1

All stats are passer ratings gathered from through the first seven weeks of the 2015 season. I’m essentially looking at current/ex starting quarterbacks and backups who have played heavy minutes (sometimes as former starters).

Continue reading The Best 3rd & 4th Down Quarterbacks in Major College Football

Brandon Allen & Rohan Gaines After Arkansas Lost to Toledo

The following are excerpts from interviews held after the Arkansas football team’s lost 12-16 to Toledo in September, 2015 in Little Rock:

Brandon, you guys were one for five going into the red zone; you got down there; how tough was that? What was going on in the red zone?

Brandon Allen: We were killing ourselves, we felt like we could score. We had a bunch of plays held back. Couldn’t punch it in for the life of us today. Can’t win against anybody if we’re one for five.

On the struggles of the run game:

Allen: We couldn’t get it going. Got to give them credit, they did a good job stopping it, but can’t win one-dimensional. Got to get around the ball, and we couldn’t.

You outgained them by about 200 yards. You gained over 500 yards. Normally you do that you’re going to win. How frustrating was that?

Allen:  Very… Were one for five in the red zone there. You can get all the yards you want but it doesn’t matter if you can’t put it into the end zone.

As a leader of this football team what do you have to do this week to get ready for Texas Tech?

Allen: I know this team. We have our minds right, and this isn’t going to affect the rest of the season. We have a lot of games left. Tomorrow we will watch the film, we’ll move on, and we’ll be ready for Texas Tech. I know this team. There’s no quit. This is one game. We got ten more, a lot of games to play, and the team’s got their mind right, and we’re going to play each and every game like it’s our last one. We’re trying to play them all.

85 yards in penalties. Coach B’s playing clean didn’t get it done today in that area. Any thoughts?

Allen: That killed us. It really did. Any time we had momentum going on offense, you know, we’d get a holding call or something, get held back, and I think we scored a touchdown at the end, holding call called it back; so we’re really killing our momentum with penalties, and can’t win when you’re killing yourself.

On the last drive of the game:

Allen: I felt like we were going to score, and we moved the ball pretty much all day; can’t punch it in, and got all the way down there, give ourselves a chance. Last play, kind of just dropped it; went out in the in zone but there was nobody to throw it to, and kind of stumbled a little bit.


What’s the locker room feel like right now?

Rohain Gaines: I feel like we’ve got enough leaders to turn things around. I’ve been down this road before. I’ve been here for a long time and I know it can go one of two ways. I feel like with the leaders that we have on this team it can go up from here.

What’s the key to making it go the right way?

Gaines: You just have to come back and prepare. We have to come back Sunday and work, we got to come back Monday, get some overtime. Got to come back Tuesday, Wednesday practice, Thursday practice, Friday practice, and Saturday play our ball.

What did they do to surprise you guys? They seemed like they had a lot of wide open guys running free to pass to the linebackers.

Gaines: Give all the credit to Tolito. They’ve got some great athletes. They called great plays and they obviously schemed us up.


What’s it feel like?

JaMichael Winston:   It’s terrible, it’s a terrible feeling. Unbelievable feeling. Those guys came in here and earned their win and we didn’t today.

What did they do that gave you guys problems?

Winston: There was a lot of scheming up. They schemed us up pretty good. They got on us. You can tell they’ve been working on them for a while.

A lot of the times expect Arkansas playing a team like that to out physical them and it seemed like it was the other way. Were you surprised at how physical they were?

Winston: Yeah, they were pretty physical today. They came out with a lot of energy today and played good football and earned a win.

There’s been times when a loss like this for a big program can affect the next game and the next game. What did coach talk about in that post game about making it just be the one loss and not letting it linger.

Winston: Just having a 1-and-0 mentality and moving on to the next one. Can’t let one bad game affect the next, just got to go on, going on Sunday. Start focusing on Texas Tech and get better.

Winston: What was happening on the third and long because they converted several third and longs.

Winston: They were getting the ball out quick to their guy, that guy  number 40 was doing a good job at catching the ball and getting the first down.


Mitch Smothers: We didn’t earn that victory today. We didn’t come out and we didn’t play Arkansas football like we should. We just didn’t come ready to play.

Why did you not?

Smothers: I feel like it starts with me, but it’s just that the preparation we did and just … I just felt like we didn’t come out and did what we should have.

You guys out-gained them by a couple hundred yards. How tough is that to lose a game when you dominated like that statistically?

Smothers: We didn’t play clean enough. We had too many penalties, pre-snap penalties, post-snap penalties that drove us back. You can’t win football games when you have that many penalties.

Given what happened last year, with grounding and pounding people, it looked like this year was set up to be that again. Today, maybe not the rushing numbers you’d like. Same with last week. What do you think’s going on there?

Well, we’re not going to let one game define this whole season. We’ve still got a lot of football left to play. We’re definitely going to work on that.

What’s been the difference, though, in the rushing game, in not getting the yards you guys-

Smothers: These first two opponents, they like to move a lot on us. We just didn’t come ready to move them vertical like we should have. Like I said, we’re going to come … We’ll become better.

When you say they didn’t come ready, are you guys not prepared for this one?

Smothers:        I started to say … I’m just going to go back to what Coach B said. We just didn’t earn it. We didn’t come out and play Arkansas football. That’s all I got to say about that.

Since you guys are one to five scoring in the red zone, what do you think when you’re standing down there?

Smothers:        It’s definitely very frustrating, but then again, it goes back to us up front, me included. We didn’t run the ball like we should have today. That’s the one thing you’ve got to do in the red zone is run the football if you want to win a football games.

Arkansas State’s Coaching Carousel of Success Not So Historic?

Arkansas State fans often feel slighted by media in central Arkansas (despite KATV sports anchor Steve Sullivan’s strong ASU ties as an alum), but reasons for that chip on the shoulder are dwindling. On Christmas Day, the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette made an unusual move in naming not one – but 10 individuals – as its “Sportsmen of the Year.” More unusual was the fact the sportsmen weren’t associated with the University of Arkansas.

Reporter Troy Schulte did a good job writing the piece [$$], and he got some interesting insight from ASU linebacker Frankie Jackson, one of the ten fifth-year seniors who persevered despite going through the tumult of five head coaches in five years.  “No matter what came in, it was still, turn to your left, turn to your right and you still have the same players you knew from your freshman year,” Jackson said of his classmates from the 2010 signing class. “It wasn’t the head coach, it was the team that I wanted to be a part. It didn’t matter that Roberts left, Freeze left, or Malzahn left or Harsin left — I was still with my team.”

Those are rare words coming from a player still playing for a mid-major/major Division I football program.

Usually, football program try to sell the coach as the face of the program for obvious recruiting reasons. Putting the coach front and center as the program’s public figurehead also helps boost coaches’ show ratings and sell tickets for booster club meetings. Arkansas State’s situation is so unique, however, that the “players first” slant is the only one that works without coming off as ridiculously out of tune. That being said, it will be interesting to see if the ASU football program makes this article part of its recruiting package to its current high school and junior college targets.

On one hand, this kind of front page exposure and honor seems like something the Red Wolves would want to play up to its recruits – “Hey, look, the Hogs aren’t the only major football player in state, and Arkansas’ biggest newspaper agrees!” On the other hand, if you’re current ASU coach Blake Anderson, what do you do say in response to Jackson’s words here –

“It wasn’t the head coach, it was the team that I wanted to be a part.”

Anderson’s got much bigger things to worry about, of course. He’s leading ASU into the GoDaddy Bowl on Jan. 4 in Mobile, Ala., where it hopes to pick up its third consecutive bowl win. This would cap the fourth consecutive winning season for the ASU, a major accomplishment considering from 1992 to 2010 the program had endured 16 losing seasons.

For the Red Wolves, annual coaching turnover has gone hand and hand with consistent winning since Hugh Freeze took over for Steve Roberts in December 2010.  Schulte points out that in the last 100 years this unusual combination is unprecedented: “The only other known team to go through such change at the sport’s highest division was Kansas State in 1944-1948, but those teams won just four games through that transition.”

Going back farther in time, though, there is one program that likely comes closest to replicating ASU’s combination of high success and high coaching turnover.

From 1895 to 1906, Oregon had 10 winning seasons and two undefeated ones. Still, the Webfoots went through nine coaching changes in that span. Granted, college football coaching was then approximately 6.5 million times less lucrative in that era, so the young men who so often became coaches immediately after their playing college careers sometimes jumped ship simply to pursue a career in which they could make serious money.

Take Hugo Bezdek, who led Oregon to a 5-0-1 record in 1906, his only season there. Instead of returning, though, he returned to his alma mater the University of Chicago to pursue medical school. Still, nobody forgot the Prague native’s prowess. “Bezdek is by nature imbued with a sort of Slavic pessimism that makes him a coach par excellence,” according to a 1916 Oregon Daily Journal article. “His success lies in his ability to put the fight into his men.”

Someone at the University of Arkansas heard about Bezdek’s ability and reached out to the 24-year-old to offer a position as the football, track and baseball coach (Oh, and entire athletic directorship, while he was at it). Bezdek arrived in Fayetteville in 1908 and a year later his team went undefeated (7-0-0), winning the unofficial championships of the South and Southwest. In 1910, the team was 7-1-0. Impressed with the mean-tempered hogs that roamed the state, Bezdek observed that his boys “played like a band of wild Razorbacks” after coming home from a game against LSU. The new name caught on, and in 1914 the Cardinals officially became the Razorbacks.

The Red Wolf Ten

Below are the ten 5th year seniors who have ASU on the cusp of 36 wins – what would be its second-most successful four-year run ever. “It’s a miracle on a cotton patch up here,” former coach Larry Lacewell told the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. Lacewell, ASU’s all-time winningest coach, led the program to its best four-year run of 37 victories in 1984-1987. Lace well said these seniors “brought tradition and pride back to Arkansas State.”

1. Brock Barnhill; DB; Mountain Home; Former walk-on; special teams contributor

2. William Boyd; WR; Cave City; Walk-on earned scholarship. Caught first career pass this season

3. Tyler Greve; C; Jonesboro; Started 12 games at center this season

4. Frankie Jackson; DB; Baton Rouge; Played RB and LB (917 career yards, 65 career tackles)

5. Ryan Jacobs; DB; Evans, Ga.; Played mostly on special teams; 11 tackles, 1 fumble recovery

6. Qushaun Lee; MLB; Prattville, Ala.; Fourth all-time on ASU’s career tackles list (390)

7. Kenneth Rains; TE; Hot Springs;7 starts; 14-160 receiving, 3 TDs

8. Andrew Tryon; SS; Russellville; 24 starts; 149 tackles, 20 breakups, 3 INTs;

9. Alan Wright; RG; Cave City; 21 starts

10. Sterling Young; FS; Hoover, Ala.; 45 consecutive starts: 268 tackles, 151 unassisted; 7-59 INTs

NB: Defensive tackle Markel Owens also would have been a fifth-year senior this season. He was shot and killed at his mother’s home in Jackson, Tenn., in January, 2014.

Above information taken from Arkansas Democrat-Gazette and ASU athletic department.

Arkansan Mike Dunaway, Whom Greg Norman Called World’s Longest Driver, Dies

Dunaway was the first professional long driver to   grace the cover of Golf magazine

It was in 1985 that Conway native Mike Dunaway announced himself to the world as not only one its most powerful drivers, but possibly golf’s savviest self promoter. On the cover of Golf, the former UCA linebacker stood atop a mound of money and boasted that he would pay anyone who could drive a golf ball farther than he could, that person could take the entire $10,000 beneath his feet.

“One soul stepped up to the tee, was thrashed, and the magazine bested its previous single-issue sales record,” the  Arkansas Democrat-Gazette’s Bobby Ampezzan wrote in 2009. That exposure and success propelled Dunaway, who died Monday at age 59 in Rogers, into becoming a one-man marketing hurricane in the niche sport of long driving, in which the act of hitting as much hell out of a ball as is physically possible with a piece of graphite becomes something like science.

“Long driving back then, you kind of got your name out there from folklore,” Dunaway told Ampezzan. “I mean, I’d do exhibitions, and I would hit the ball farther than anybody. But then if I came back in five or six years, to hear people talk about the distance, it would take two shots to match it — with an air cannon! Folklore and bar talk. But that’s all fishing was until they started those $1 million bass tournaments.”

Over the decades, Dunaway penned numerous instructional articles and appeared in videos touting his technique. In the 1990s, he hosted the TV show “Golfing Arkansas” and appeared at events with 1991 PGA champion and fellow Arkansan John Daly. PGA Tour great Greg Norman said of Dunaway: “This is the longest driver in the world,” according to a 1991 Arkansas Democrat-Gazette article.

For Dunaway, the notion “Drive for show, putt for dough” did not apply. For years, he used a pure technique honed at the feet of the sport’s Yoda and a powerful 5-11, 245-pound frame to make a living from whacking living daylight out of pebbled sphere. In the early 1990s, he won a $25,000 distance shootout in Texas and $40,000 from the world’s richest long-drive contest in Japan. His longest drive in competition was a 389-yarder in Utah.

Continue reading Arkansan Mike Dunaway, Whom Greg Norman Called World’s Longest Driver, Dies

Pay You, Pay Me: Buy Out Clauses in Arkansan College Coaching Contracts

The below article originally published in the June issue of Arkansas Money & Politics 

When it comes to big-time college sports, Arkansas State University and the University of Arkansas rarely operate on a level playing field. The Razorback athletic department pulls in nearly seven times more total revenue than the ASU Red Wolves.

There is one place Arkansas’ largest sports programs stand on equal ground: each school’s head football coach has a contract demanding the same amount of money for cutting out early. If the Hogs’ Bret Bielema had decided to break his six-year contract last year — his first on the job — he would have owed the U of A $3 million*. Three million is also what the Red Wolves’ new coach Blake Anderson would pay to leave ASU during his first year. This symmetry is all the more striking because Bielema’s and Anderson’s salaries aren’t even close: Bielema makes $3.2 million a year, Anderson makes $700,000.

Conversely, if they leave at the behest of the schools, the coaches can look to pocket some walking-away money.

It’s all a matter of strategy and context, a common game played by universities across the country. Still, fans can be certain of one thing: in the world of coaches’ contracts, terms for parting ways matter every bit as much as the salary.

In the biggest conferences, a $3 million buyout provision isn’t all that large. In a conference as relatively small as ASU’s Sun Belt, though, this kind of number is almost certainly unprecedented — much like the situation in which ASU football finds itself on the whole.

“When you’ve gone through what we’ve gone through the last few years,” ASU athletic director Terry Mohajir said, “you learn a little bit.”

Since 2010, ASU has hired four different coaches. The first — Hugh Freeze — had a first-year buyout of $225,000. For his successors, that figure jumped to $700,000, then to $1.75 million, and now to $3 million. Where it ends, nobody knows.

Decades ago, things were simpler. Major college football coaches typically signed one-year contracts, which would roll over to the next year if they did a good job. Things started changing in the 1980s with the advent of bigger broadcast deals and the proliferation of cable sports programming. As multi-year contracts prevailed in the late 1980s and 1990s, “the institutions began looking for a commitment from the coach,” U of A athletic director Jeff Long said. At first, “it was really a one-way street and now it’s evolved into a two-way street on the contractual buyout terms.”

In business terms, the institution is looking for security after investing in a risky asset — the head football coach — that can either add or lose a great amount of revenue. Perversely, either one makes the coach more likely to leave. A chronically underwhelming coach is likely to be fired by the school, while star performers are lured away by institutions with more elite programs.

Buyout contracts therefore typically work in two ways. If a university fires the head coach “at its convenience,” legalese often translated to “too many games were lost,” the school usually gives the coach a ton of money to go away. Bielema, for instance, would be paid $12.8 million if he were fired in this context in his first three seasons. For Anderson, the number is $3 million if he’s let go in his first year. The University of Central Arkansas’ Steve Campbell would be paid $7,000 a month for the remainder of his contract ending Dec. 31, 2017, if he were fired; and the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff’s Monte Coleman would get his annual base salary of $150,000 paid to him over 18 months.

In the 21st century, major college coaches’ salaries — and attendant buyouts — have grown hand-in-hand.

Continue reading Pay You, Pay Me: Buy Out Clauses in Arkansan College Coaching Contracts

Buy Out Clauses in State of Arkansas’ Division I Coaching Contracts

When it comes to big-time college sports, Arkansas State University and the University of Arkansas rarely operate on a level playing field. The Hogs attract more fans, play in a bigger conference, get more national exposure and make more money.  The UA’s athletic department pulls in nearly seven times more total revenue than Arkansas States’.

But there’s one place the state of Arkansas’ largest sports programs stand on equal ground. Each school’s head football coach has a contract demanding the same amount of money for cutting out early. If the Hogs’ Bret Bielema had decided to break his six-year contract last year – his first on the job – then he would have owed the UA $3 million. Three million is also the price the Red Wolves’ Blake Anderson would have to pay if he left ASU during his first year. This equality is all the more striking because Bielema and Anderson’s salaries aren’t even close to being in the same neighborhood: Bielema makes $3.2 million a year to Anderson’s $700,000.

How these schools got to this particular $3 million figure is part coincidence, part strategy, and all a matter of context. In the biggest conferences, a $3 million “buyout” provision isn’t all that high. Not with the likes of Louisville’s Bobby Petrino walking around with a $10 million buyout. In a conference as relatively small as the Sun Belt, though, a number like this is unprecedented – much like the situation in which ASU football finds itself on the whole. “When you’ve gone through what we’ve gone through the last few years,” ASU athletic director Terry Mohajir says,  “you learn a little bit.”


Since 2010, ASU has hired four separate head coaches. The first of those – Hugh Freeze – had a first-year buyout of $225, 000. For succeeding coaches, that figure jumped to $700,000 , then to $1.75 million, and now to $3 million. Where it ends, nobody knows.

Still, fans can be certain of one thing for sure: in the world of coaches’ contracts, terms for parting ways matter every bit as much as the salary figures themselves.



Decades ago, things were simpler. Major college football coaches signed one-year contracts for amounts that didn’t always make them their state’s highest paid public employee. If they did a good job, the contract rolled over to the next year. But things started changing in the 1980s with the advent of bigger broadcast deals and the proliferation of cable sports programming. The best coaches started going to the richest schools which were also offering higher-paying, multi-year deals. But as multi-year contracts prevailed in the late 1980s and 1990s, “the institutions began looking for a commitment from the coach,” Arkansas athletic director Jeff Long said. At first, “it was really a one-way street and now it’s evolved into a two-way street on the contractual buyout terms.”

Look at it in business terms: The institution is looking for security after investing in a risky asset – the head coach – that can add or lose a great amount of revenue. Too much of one of the other – for all programs but the very top ones – make the coach more likely to leave. That departure not only means a loss in investments until that point, but likely a substantial cut future returns, too.


For more, read the rest of my article as it originally published in Arkansas Money & Politics Magazine.

It’s on Page 27 of this digital version

ASU and the UA Should Use the Natural State to their Recruiting Advantage


The great outdoors, design, football.

A decade ago, the typical college athletics administrator likely concerns himself only with the last of these.

Not anymore. These worlds are colliding with unprecedented frequency as self-marketing matters more and more in college football. Across the nation, programs are jazzing up their facilities and uniforms in an effort to attract recruits, media coverage and donations. Ambitious programs are realizing more variation – in color, shade, design – is better.

Two trends have emerged, one piggybacking on the other.

The first trend entailed marketing an array of different uniforms designs and colors that went beyond a program’s traditional road color and home white. Oregon football kicked this off in 2006 by unveiling a dizzying array of pant, jersey and helmet combinations. Merchandise sales soared as Oregon became one of the nation’s hottest programs.

Around 2011, an offshoot trend emerged where designs of jerseys and playing surfaces incorporate local, geophysical flavor. Here, heritage – natural or man-made – meets the all-important “buzz” factor.

Oregon basketball, one of the first to get into the act, superimposed onto its new court silhouette images of the state’s native fir tree. Other programs have made similar moves. Palm tree images now frame the courts of Long Beach and Florida International universities.

Wyoming football last year unveiled a new artificial turf with a depiction of the state’s Teton Range in both end zones. The lettering “7220 feet” is on both sidelines, marking the stadium’s record-setting elevation above sea level.

Even older, more established programs have gone down a similar, though more subtle, path.

Programs are also using man-made objects to promote their brands. Take Maryland, which in 2011 launched a “state pride” initiative that put the design of its distinctive state flag (the nation’s only one to feature British heraldic banners) on Terrapin football helmets and end zones.

 Indiana went the same flag-based route with one its new football helmet variants.

 So, should Arkansas join the movement?

 Without a doubt.

Our state has far too much iconic imagery to stand on the sidelines and not take advantage. Why, for instance, should the Hogs settle for white helmets and black jerseys when there are so many more interesting, Arkansas-specific designs that could be used?

 We’re the Natural State. It’s high time those playing our best football programs know it.

I’ve shared some ways already on Sporting Life Arkansas – including a diamond Razorback helmet – but below are some others that would work for any program in the state even thought I highlight Arkansas and Arkansas State.

1. According to a Washington, Ark. newspaper article in 1841, the Bowie knife was originally invented not by frontiersman extraordinaire Jim Bowie but by craftsman James Black. It became known as one of the most dangerous big knives in the region, just as Bielema’s Hogs aim to become of the most feared teams in the SEC.  Use a a small silhouette or outline of this knife somewhere on the uniform, perhaps down the side of the legs. Make the blade diamond-like for extra points.

2. Arkansas’ Buffalo River was the first National River to be designated in the United States and along with the Hogs is one of north Arkansas’ prime attractions. It’s time they join forces. Why not incorporate an image representing running water onto the perimeter of the field at Reynolds Razorback Stadium?

3. The Red Wolves and now the Razorbacks have a thing going with mostly-black unis, we know. Tough guy and all that. But so many other programs do that, too. Why not separate yourself from the pack by incorporating colors from the most visually stunning bird native to the state? In the hands of a skilled designer, adding flecks of color from the scissor-tailed flycatcher onto the dark background would be a sure-thing eyecatcher.

The above is an update of an article that originally ran in Sync magazine in summer 2013.



List of All Division I Football Players Born in Arkansas

There are so many Arkansans who play Division I football. You know this, on a gut level. What you don’t know – on any level – is the name of every single last one of those Arkansans. That ends now.

So come, brother, and let the waters below sate your parched mind:

Arkansas has produced two Harvard football players - including Andrew Flesher, two-time Ivy League Special Teams Player of the Week.
Arkansas is home to two current Harvard football players – including Andrew Flesher, two-time Ivy League Special Teams Player of the Week.

The below stats are current as of fall 2013. I have listed the most recent 2014 signees at the bottom.

20140205_123716 20140205_123726 20140205_123733 20140205_123738 20140205_12374320140205_123754

All spreadsheets courtesy of Benn Stencil of Mode. Check here for a breakdown of which Arkansas counties produce the most talent per capita. 

2014 Signees

Tyler Colquitt – LB 5-10 235 Pulaski Academy
Toney Hawkins – QB 6-1 185 Morrilton
Will Jones – OT 6-4 300 Parkers Chapel
Curtis Parker – OG 6-2 280 North Little Rock
Dalvin Simmons – DE 6-2 220 LR Central
Josiah Wymer – TE 6-4 262 Springdale

Josh Frazier – DT 6-3 330 Springdale Har-Ber

Devohn Lindsey – WR 6-2 198 North Little Rock

Tyrone Carter – WR 6-2 175 Rayville, La./Arkansas Baptist JC
Isaac Jackson – QB 6-2 210 FS Southside
Jake Snyder – OT 6-3 270 Wynne

Ty Mullens# – DL 6-1 220 Smackover

Jarvis Cooper – DL/LB 6-2 245 West Memphis

Daryl Coburn – DT 6-1 325 LR Central
Deion Holliman – WR 5-9 165 Camden Fairview
Colby Isbell – DE 6-2 240 Rogers Heritage

Austin McGehee – PK/P 6-0 200 Pine Bluff

Jabe Burgess* – QB 6-2 200 Greenwood
Jordan Dennis – ATH 6-1 175 Fayetteville
Isaac Johnson – OT 6-6 275 Springdale Har-Ber
Tim Quickel – LB 6-1 200 North Little Rock

Zack Wary – LB 6-4 215 Rogers
#Walk on *Enrolled NOTE – Most players listed for Lyon are signees


Kavin Alexander DB 5’10 190 North Little Rock HS (North Little Rock, AR)
Lawrence Berry WR 5’11 170 Parkview HS (Little Rock, AR)
Kyron Lawson DL 6’6 230 Mills HS (Little Rock, AR)
Patrick Rowland WR 5’10 165 Parkview HS (Little Rock, AR)

Alvin Bailey, Ross Rasner, Tarvaris Jackson, Sean McGrath, Ty Powell & the Super Bowl

Ex Hog and Bronco Ross Rasner sure knows how to get after it.
Ex Hog and Bronco Ross Rasner sure knows how to get after it. Via Instagram
McDonald (upper left) with other 2004 all-metro players such as Darren McFadden (#5) (via Arkansas Democrat-Gazette)

Heading into this Sunday’s Super Bowl, there appears to be three players with Arkansas ties on the rosters of the Denver Broncos and Seattle Seahawks. The one who will likely play the biggest role in the game itself is Clinton McDaniel, a Jacksonville native/pass rusher extraordinaire who specializes in collapsing the pocket on third downs. Learn more about him in my Sporting Life Arkansas profile here.

Offensive lineman Alvin Bailey also looks to get some burn in the big game. The former Razorback left school early last spring, went undrafted, but has carved out a nice niche for himself in Seattle. He threw a key block in the NFC Championship game to spring running back Marshawn Lynch for a 40-yard touchdown run. Those points proved to be the winning margin in a game which finished 23-17.

“I’m having the time of a lifetime,” Bailey told The Oklahoman’s Berry Tramel.

He’s made no starts. But Bailey played about a dozen snaps in the NFC Championship Game as an extra lineman. And he cleared out 49er safety Donte Whitner, allowing Lynch to score and put the Seahawks in control.

Bailey said leaving Arkansas wasn’t just a good decision, “it was a great decision.”

“I thought I was going to get drafted. Things didn’t work out that way. But I made it to the Seahawks, we’re in the Super Bowl now. I don’t regret anything.”


Btw, here’s a nice KARK interview with Bailey’s gargantuan uncle, who’s livin’ large in Little Rock and is the main reason Bailey chose to attend Arkansas in the first place.

Tarvaris Jackson

Jackson hardly looked like a future pro during his two seasons as Razorback quarterback in 2002 and 2003. He had plenty “physical tools,” sure, but so does every other QB who starts at least one game in the SEC. What he lacked was the maturity to put it all together, and the patience to see it through in Fayetteville. Ten years after he transferred to Alabama State, he becomes the most unlikely former Razorback quarterback to be on a Super Bowl roster only a couple years after becoming the most unlikely ex Hog to throw for 3,000 yards in the NFL.

To me, it doesn’t matter that he likely won’t play a snap. Or that in the last week he has inspired such headlines as “Tarvaris Jackson’s Super Bowl Preparation is Sad and Boring.” But laugh not. Appreciate how amazing it is he’s almost been in the League for a full decade at QB, given how uninspiring his UA days were. It would be like time traveling to the NFL circa 2022 only to find Brandon Mitchell there as a savvy backup QB to Rafe Peavey in the Cowboy’s long-awaited return to the Super Bowl.

The Left Overs

None of the following guys with Arkansas college ties are on the rosters for Denver or Seattle. But don’t discount the part they played earlier in the season sharpening their teammates for the long haul.

1. Ross Rasner – Ras-Nasty sure could deliver a hit in his Hog days in 2009-2012, whether on special teams, as linebacker or safety. He wasn’t the most technically sound decleater we’ve ever seen on the Hill, so it wasn’t a surprise when he went unpicked in the 2013 Draft. Still, there was some cause for optimism when Denver signed Rasner as a free agent last spring and brought him to camp. Even if rookie stuff like this was happening:


Unfortunately, in the end, the burden of beating out veteran safeties like Quentin Jammer and Mike Adams for a final roster spot was too much to bear. Rasner was cut on August 31, 2013. He hasn’t yet resigned with another team, but if you think this is a man feeling down on his luck, these swag-tastic Instagram updates will have you thinking otherwise:

ras nasty

2. Sean McGrath

The 6-5, 247-pound McGrath is one of the most physically imposing college players to come out of Clark County, Ark. since Cowboys great Cliff Harris. While Harris played for Ouachita Baptist University, McGrath played in 2010 and 2011 for Henderson State after transferring from Eastern Illinois.

The Illinois native found the culture change tough at first, as he shared with ESPNW:

After two seasons as an EIU Panther, McGrath was dismissed for a violation of team rules… He got some help finding his next step from his assistant coach at EIU, Jeff Hoover, who would die in a car accident just a few months later.

“I was fortunate,” McGrath said of getting a second chance. “The late Jeff Hoover hooked me up with Coach [Scott] Maxfield down at Henderson State U, and bada-bing, bada-boom, I’m in the Bible Belt. Arkadelphia, Arkansas.”

Sounds made up, but it’s a real place. There were, of course, a few growing pains for McGrath, who adjusted to the South while sitting out the 2009 season.

“It’s a different place,” he said. “When I first got down there I didn’t know what a dry county was. Needless to say we had to get that changed. Political process went into effect and, you know. Let’s just say it was wet when we left.”

By 2010 the students of Henderson State were getting their buzz on and McGrath was back on track, catching 55 passes for 565 yards and four touchdowns. He was injured for much of his senior year and went undrafted, but he refused to give up on his dream to go pro.

Last year, McGrath played as a tight end on Seattle’s practice squad for four months before finally being called up. McGrath played well and improved over the offseason. By last spring, he’d worked his way into being the Seahawks’ second-string tight end , and sent some Seattle sports opinionators into a caffeinated craze along the way. One blogger even imagined McGrath’s role in the waning minutes of a (then) hypothetical Super Bowl:

Wilson snaps the ball.  Broncos linebacker Von Miller reads the run coming his way, and attacks the line. Oddly, he finds himself moving backwards despite his legs churning forwards. Seahawks tight end Sean McGrath is walking him back off the line. It starts slowly, but McGrath gains momentum and has completely overpowered Miller by this point. Miller is a full five yards beyond the line of scrimmage when McGrath assassinates his dignity.  [emphasis mine]  He is no longer moving backwards because McGrath has planted him on his back.

McGrath was cut by Seattle on August 31, but soon picked up Kansas City. He ended up starting nine games for the Chiefs, tallying 26 receptions for 302 yards and 2 touchdowns. And he would never, ever, think of assassinating the dignity of a good locker room interview:


Keep this man away from the “Discovery Channel”!

3. Ty Powell

Seattle head coach Pete Carroll loves his linebacker/safeties fast, physical, big and snarling. That’s why he chose the 6’2″, 248-pound Powell in the seventh round, with the 231 overall pick, in the 2013 Draft. Powell had been plenty impressive at Harding University, where he was ranked the 17th best outside linebacker in the nation (inc. Division I) after a 2012 season that included 12 tackles for loss, 8.5 sacks and four blocked kicks [This, btw, may be a single season Arkansas college football record. Perhaps Hog Dan Skipper will break it…]

Powell says in the below video he believed he could have gone as high as the third or fourth round, so when he dropped to seventh he was left with a bit of a “chip on my shoulder”:


If Powell had a chip on his shoulder then, you know he had a veritable tortilla shell on the shoulder after being waived by the Seahawks this past September. Buffalo snapped the linebacker up the following month, though, and Powell finished with nine tackles in the the last four games of the season.

P.S. Kicker Eddie Carmona, who nailed a 62-yd FG at Harding, signed w/ Oakland in 2011, 2012
P.S. Kicker Eddie Carmona, who nailed a 62-yd FG at Harding, signed w/ Oakland in 2011, 2012

Every Arkansas State Head Coach Marches to the Beat of His Predecessor’s Drummer

The Twitterverse is convulsing with this morning’s news that Bryan Harsin has left Jonesboro to take over the head coaching job at his alma mater Boise State. Harsin is only the latest of a series of one-year football coaches at Arkansas State. The constant turnover has been hard on the players, sure, but the good news for the program is that it will end up netting $1 million off the early buy-out clause Harsin had to sign last December. As Deadspin’s Barry Petchesky put it, “the Red Wolves job is like an unpaid internship. It’ll cost you money in the short term, but just think of it as an audition for the job you actually want.”

If you include interim coaches, Arkansas State will soon have its seventh head coach since December 2010. This kind of turnover may be unprecedented in college or pro football, but it’s not so unique in the world of iconic mockumentaries starring Christopher Guest:


H/T to Deadspin commentor Mittens Romney