Is Wrigley’s Racism to Blame for Chicago Cubs’ World Series Drought?

Why have the Chicago Cubs been so bad, for so long? Lore has it blame should fall at the smelly feet of a billy goat  Since the day in 1945 when Cubs owner P.K. Wrigley blocked William Sianis from bringing his pet goat through the Wrigley Field turnstiles, the Cubs haven’t won a single National League pennant. In the decades following that rebuff, the Cubs became one of the worst teams in pro baseball.

The real reasons behind Chicago’s struggles don’t entail P.K. Wrigley’s refusal of a goat. They hinge more on his refusal to admit “G.O.A.T.s.” Wrigley worked within miles of some of the greatest Negro Leagues players of all time during the 1930s and early 1940s. Chicago hosted the league’s annual All-Star game and Wrigley Field itself was home to a Negro League team and occasional all-black barnstorming teams featuring the likes of Satchel Paige.

For years Wrigley was exposed to ample evidence black baseball players were as good as white baseball players. He had even more evidence after Jackie Robinson broke down the Major League color wall in 1947, and in the following years the likes of Roy Campanella, Don Newcombe, Larry Doby and Satchel Paige followed. After Robinson’s first year, “the bold and smart owners reached into the talent-rich Negro League and grabbed instant stars,” columnist Mike Royko wrote in the Chicago Tribune in 1993. By the time the Cubs started hiring black players, “they had established themselves as the most predictable klutzes in the National League. Had Wrigley the brains and/or the courage—he definitely had the money—the modern tradition of the Cubs might have been entirely different.”

In 1942, a local African-American committee advocating for blacks in the major leagues brought this issue directly to Wrigley’s office. Wrigley listened to a representative make his case, then told him while he would like to see blacks in the MLB, “I don’t think the time is now.” He feared the potential of rioting and didn’t think there would be “sufficient public demand” despite enormous crowds which the best black baseball players drew in Chicago at that time.

Wrigley appeared to thaw a bit in the following year. In 1943, he announced the Cubs would soon hire a scout to solely focus on the Negro Leagues. But when pressed on whether this hire meant he was ready to sign black players, Wrigley said “The middle of a war isn’t the spot to make such a departure from custom. I told [the committee members] that we would not stick our necks out now,” according to Steve Bogira’s 2014 article in the Chicago Reader.

Delaying integration wasn’t the only reason the Cubs franchise essentially nosedived after that 1945 World Series appearance. The Cubs depended heavily on purchasing players from independent minor league teams. After those teams folded, the Cubs were one of the last MLB clubs to assemble a minor league farm system. Even then, for decades, they struggled to develop their minor league talent.

Yet, for Chicago fans, it’s hard not to daydream about what could have been. What if P.K. Wrigley had even half the guts of Branch Rickey, the Brooklyn Dodgers executive who signed the Negro Leagues stars and launched his franchise to the top?

 

No doubt, the question loomed large in the minds of Chicago Defender writers in May 1949 as the Cubs slogged through another dismal campaign. Robinson and Campanella had just helped the Dodgers twice clobber the Cubs, inspiring a Defender to take a jab at Wrigley:  “Some years ago when efforts were made to get Negroes in major league ball clubs, the stock reply was that the public had to be ‘educated’ before this could happen. Branch Rickey, who is the kind of American that keeps democracy alive, simply hired Jackie Robinson and told those who did not like it to lump it. Now this is the kind of ‘education’ that really educates.”

 

The columnist continued: “Incidentally, the Cubs got two powerful lessons last week out at Wrigley field and the two professors were Robinson and Campanella.”

 

***

 

In the 1950s, the Cubs brought on board African-American star Ernie Banks, but their record still remained dismal. As I read through Steve Bogira’s article, I was struck by a couple Arkansas ties. I present them here simply for the sake of trivia:

  • Banks convinced Arkansas City, Ark. native John Johnson, the publisher of Ebony and Jet, to buy Cubs season tickets for a year in the 1960s. “To Banks’s knowledge, Johnson was the Cubs’ first African-American season-ticket holder. But not long after Banks sold him the pair of tickets, Johnson ‘called me and said, ‘Ernie, I gotta cancel my tickets. I can’t get nobody to go with me!’”
  • In 1964, the Cubs traded El Dorado, Ark. native Lou Brock (a future Hall of Famer) to St. Louis for Ernie Broglio, a pitcher who would win six games in two seasons. It has gone down as one the worst trades in baseball history. While some of the Cubs’ reasoning involved Brock’s subpar fielding, prejudice also played a role, according to an essay written by former Cubs coach Buck O’Neil.

When general manager John Holland was deliberating on the move, O’Neil warned him not to trade Brock away. Holland’s response involved pulling out a mass of letters from season-ticket holders. Complaints about the increasing number of black players signed by the Cubs filled them. O’Neil recalled Holland saying some of the fans wrote: “What are you trying to make the Chicago Cubs into? The Kansas City Monarchs?”

 

Nick Saban On Why Alabama Consistently Gets Hosed By Ole Miss

And other insights from the Alabama football head coach from the transcript of his 15th SEC Media Day appearance


Not exactly what Mark Stoops experiences

NICK SABAN: The one thing that I will miss is I’m usually up here responding to some barb from Coach [Steve] Spurrier, who is no longer with us and is retired, and probably playing a lot of golf, which we just wish he and Jerri the very best in the future. He’s made a tremendous impact on the game and I’m sure will continue to do that with his leadership and deeds and actions even though he’s not coaching.

Verne Lundquist who is the only person that I know, and there may be somebody else out there in the media or somewhere, that has spanned my entire career. Verne tells my wife Terry about a game that I was coaching at Kent State when I was first coaching 40-some years ago that he actually covered. So he — and he’s done a tremendous amount for the SEC on CBS in terms of the great job that he’s done with his telecast, and we wish him very well after this season, because this will be his last…

One of the very difficult experiences for us this summer was the terrible flood in West Virginia, which is where we’re from. And I think you probably all know we made a statement about trying to get some equipment for I think seven high schools that lost just about everything. So anything that you all could do to promote that to get equipment for these young people so that they’ll be able to participate and have a season this year, because otherwise they won’t, would certainly appreciated.

But after this week, our coaches will be back, and we’ll be making final preparations for our season. Our players report on August 3rd and we practice on August 4th, and we’re certainly looking forward to that. We continue to try to develop our players in so many ways, even over the summer, where we have all of our players now for summer school in terms of personal development programs, whether it’s mental conditioning for success, peer intervention for behavioral issues, leadership, communication, all of these things that create value in players that help them be more successful in life, and obviously academics is a big part of that.

We’re really, really proud of what we’ve been able to do to create a very positive history of academic success with our players in terms of — I think our graduation rate is well over 80 percent for several years now. One of the tops in the country, one of the leaders in the conference. Also a number of graduates that participate in playoff and bowl games and championship games. Last year we had 29. Three guys who already had master’s degrees, guys out there playing against Clemson that already had their degrees. I think we’ve been the leader in that regard for the past three years as well…

I’m really proud of the players that we have here representing our team. Jonathan Allen and Eddie Jackson on defense. Both players will graduate in December. O.J. Howard, who has already graduated and working on a master’s degree in sports medicine. All three of these players probably could have gone out for the draft and chose to stay in school and sort of enhance their draft status as well as finish their education or continue their education…

Our team has had a very good offseason. I’ve been very pleased with the progress that we made. We obviously lost some really, really good players from last year’s championship team, good leadership, good people. Great team chemistry. All things that are intangibles that are difficult to build, and our challenge is to recognize as they develop, because those things just don’t happen overnight. You know, it’s a work in progress. And it’s certainly been the case with our team this year.

But a year ago I didn’t know that we were going to have that kind of team chemistry when I stood up here and talked to you. I didn’t know we would have that kind of commitment. I didn’t know we would respond to adversity the way we did. And even though we’re trying to work on creating those things with the personality of this team, we don’t know that for sure either. But I’ve been pleased with the progress that we’ve made in the offseason, the spring practice that we had, the summer conditioning program.

We obviously had some challenges. For the third year in a row, I’m standing up here talking about somebody’s going to be a new quarterback for us. Somebody’s got to win that job. Somebody’s got to win the team. You know, that has not necessarily happened yet and, you know, I’m not going to sit up here and sort of try to, you know — I don’t know the right word, but give you some statistics on who’s winning the race and how the race is going and who’s ahead, are they on the back stretch or in the final turn. That’s something that’s going to happen probably in fall camp. I hope in fall camp.

We have three starters back on the offensive line, which is a good start of building a good nucleus there, and we have some good young players that can develop at that position. You know who our receivers are, and we have a pretty talented group. This is the first time for many, many years that we have not had an experienced, talented running back who has proven his value, whether it was way back when Glen Coffee played, it was Mark Ingram. Mark Ingram came back and played with Trent Richardson. Trent Richardson played with Eddie Lacy. Eddie Lacy played with T.J. Yeldon. T.J. Yeldon played with Derrick Henry.

We always had one of those guys coming back. This year we lost both guys in Derrick Henry and Kenyan Drake. This will provide opportunity, even though they are less experienced, for some other players who are talented players to have a chance to succeed at that position.

Continue reading Nick Saban On Why Alabama Consistently Gets Hosed By Ole Miss

Top 10 Most Lucrative Single-Year Salaries in NBA History

Mike Conley, Jr. shares his thoughts on inking a deal bringing him $34.5 million in one season.

Mike Conley, Sr. could hardly believe it.

Same with his son, professional point guard Mike Conley. Jr. The two were looking at a five-year contract offer from Memphis owner Robert Pera sent to Jr. early in the free agent signing period. Surely, the Conleys’ eyes got a little bigger with each figure, one larger than the next, as they scanned the contract. The number attached to the last year, though, was the kicker.

“We were looking at the fifth year and I was talking to my dad and saying ‘That number can’t be right,’ Conley recalled to the Memphis Commercial  Appeal. “I never thought a day in my life that that number would be reasonable.”

The number?

And the reason? The main reason is that Conley, like a lot of other good-but-not-great players, find themselves very lucky to be free agents this summer. They are negotiating with teams with money to burn after their salary caps were raised in the wake of two events:

a) a recent TV contract agreement that will pour $26 billion dollars in the NBA coffers over the next nine years

b) a collective bargaining agreement more friendly toward players which puts half of all league revenue into their pockets

This means the floodgates have opened on a bonanza that is rewriting the record books. Below are the top one-year salaries in the history of NBA contracts*, according to sportrac.

Essentially, these are the most lucrative years in the most lucrative multi-year contracts.

Name, Season, Amount

  • Mike Conley, 2020-21, $34,502,130
  • Damian Lillard, 2020-21, $34,502,130
  • Michael Jordan, 1997-98, $33,140,000
  • DeMar DeRozan, 2020-21, $32,782,609
  • Kobe Bryant, 2013-14, $30,453,805
  • Al Horford, 2019-20, $30,123,014
  • Bradley Beal, 2020-21, $28,751,775
  • Anthony Davis, 2020-21, $28,751,775
  • Andre Drummond, 2020-21, $28,751,775
  • Carmelo Anthony, 2018-19, $27,928,140
  • Kevin Durant, 2017-18, $27,734,405
  • Nicolas Baturn, 2020-21, $27,130,435
  • Hassan Whiteside, 2019-20, $27,093,019
  • Chris Bosh, 2018-19, $26,837,720

*Agreed upon or signed

Conley, who grew up in Fayetteville, Ark., hasn’t yet specified what he’ll do with his windfall other than probably buy a new car for his mother. He’s found out the contract has certainly made him more of a celebrity in Memphis. “It doesn’t hit me as much until I go out in public,” he told the Commercial Appeal’s Ronald Tillery. “It’s like I became famous overnight. It’s like people all know the number.”

He credited Grizzly leadership for helping cement his decision to re-sign through “a great draft” and the signing of highly sought 6’10” forward Chandler Parsons. “He’s giving us something we haven’t had in a while as far as playmaking and shooting ability from that position,” Conley told Tillery.

While the money’s nice, Conley says he is far more driven to complete a mission he’s held with Zach Randolph, Tony Allen and Marc Gasol for more than half a decade now. “I want to win a championship and that’s the expectation of every guy on this team. Nothing less. We understand that we’re within a window to win.”